Counselling Sessions for Depression: Coming Out Of the Dungeon of Darkness

Counselling sessions for depression or ‘talk therapy’ as it is popularly known has been found to be an effective method for the treatment of clinical depression. Even though it may not itself treat the clinical condition of depression, alongside the medication, talking therapy can bring about wonderful results. Through an effective counselling session, the patient can find ways and methods of dealing with everyday stress inducers. Talk therapy has also been found to increase compliance in patients who do not take medication regularly.

A large-scale clinical trial, involving nearly 400 patients with treatment-resistant depression found out that the symptoms become easier to manage when the medication was given alongside talking therapy. The various benefits of counselling sessions for depression include:

Help in relieving and easing stress
Providing patients with a new perspective on their problems
Making it easier for patients to stick to their medication
Providing patients with waysthey can deal better with the side effects of their medication
People can learn to talk about their problems with another individual
Helping in the detection of the worsening of symptoms at an early stage

Different types of counselling sessions for depression

Psychodynamic therapy: This is a traditional form of therapy where the therapist explores the behaviour patterns of the patient. In most cases, the individuals are not aware of the factors that may havecontributed to the condition and these may include childhood traumas.

Interpersonal therapy: This therapy revolves around how relationships with people around play a role in contributing to the depression. This therapy focuses on practical issues. The patient learns to spot unhealthy behaviours and ways to modify them.

Behavioural therapy, cognitive therapy and their combination: This therapy allows individuals facing depression to focus on their thoughts and behaviours which contribute to their depressive condition. The therapist helps the patient to learn new ways in which they can face stressful situations and new and better ways to react to a problem. Preconceptions leading to depression symptoms will be challenged. The patient may also be given a homework assignment.

Individual counselling: This is a one-on-one session with a professional therapist who has the experience of treating depression and mood disorders. The therapist can provide the patient with strategies to manage stress and ways that can keep depression at bay once it is gone.

You can learn more and book counselling sessions at Counselling South West.

Relationships: When control becomes abuse

Everybody needs some control over themselves and their daily environment to enable a good level of mental and emotional health: powerlessness can lead to depression. This can sometimes be easier to achieve as a single person, in terms of being able to choose how to manage your time and home environment - many people choose this or to live apart from their partners.

In relationships where partners live together, control of their circumstances becomes a more complicated issue, especially in re-constituted families where there are children and finance issues involved with ex-partners. Control then becomes a delicate balance between the needs of each individual in the relationship. When this works well and both partners are flexible and considerate of the needs of the other, the relationship can run smoothly like a well-oiled machine.

Problems arise when couples feel a need to fight each other to maintain a comfortable level of control, or one partner becomes dominant and the other is subdued or frightened into submission.

Being able to make decisions and choices for oneself – how we look, speak, dress, behave - is our right as an adult unless we are conforming to standards and regulations of a particular organisation by choice e.g. school, the workplace, military. If we don’t then we are aware there will be subsequent consequences.

To a degree, it is similar in relationships and families. What is acceptable behaviour, what is not? Who decides this? Balancing individual needs with couple or family needs can be difficult. Problems arise when one partner’s need for a certain level of control involves controlling their partner in order for them to feel comfortable. This can be very obvious, or it can be more subtle and insidious. Good communication and compromise are necessary for a relationship to succeed, especially with the pressures of children, work, time and finances to juggle. When power and control become unbalanced, they can lead to arguments, anger and abuse.

Insecurity and jealousy are often reasons why one partner will try and control the other, whether it is the way they dress, their conversation, friends or activities. Controlling behaviour can range from moods, shouting and name calling to physical violence.

The initial comfortable love, companionship and security of a relationship can gradually slip into irritability, frustration and criticism. Security within the relationship can easily transform to loss of respect and it may be many years down the line before one or both partners recognise they are no longer happy. If you feel bullied, intimidated or diminished, it points to it being time for a couple to review the relationship.

So what is reasonable control and what is not? It can be very subjective. If your behaviour is enhancing and enabling your own life whilst either doing the same for your partner, or at least not restricting or repressing your partner, then is it positive? Who controls the running of the home or who disciplines the children? Is there justice in financial accessibility and spending? Are individual, couple and family time balanced and equal? Are you able to see your family and friends without feeling guilty?

Catching unresolved issues early and resolving them is important, but fear of a partner’s negative response can be intimidating. Anxiety about the possibility of the relationship ending if control issues are raised or challenged can also be inhibiting, but ignoring excessive control or putting up with it won’t make it go away – it will continue, inexorably, to more unhappiness.

Counselling can help to explore and understand the patterns of control in a relationship in a safe environment, before the relationship becomes irretrievable – and if it has reached that point, it can help to face a different future.

Relationships: New Year resolutions.

Relationships: New Year resolutions.
One month into the New Year and you may be feeling leaner, fitter, healthier and happier. If your relationships are going well, the chances are you will be at least happy, which will make your objectives easier. If not, the pleasure and energy you put into life can be sapped away by friction and unhappiness – at home, at work or with family and friends.
You may be struggling with arguments or distance in your relationship, with feelings of loss or depression from the ending of a relationship or a bereavement, or with anxiety or assertiveness issues.
By resolving to deal with these, although often the harder thing to do, you will stand to gain more long-term peace, happiness and health.

Low self-esteem

If you suffer from low self-esteem, you may or may not be aware of how far reaching the effects of it are on many areas of your life. If you are in a relationship with someone with low self-esteem, you may also find it has repercussions on a daily basis.
Low self-esteem is considered to be a thinking disorder. Negative thoughts about ourselves are not based on reality but usually prompted by the opinions and responses of significant people in our lives. This can seriously affect attitudes, emotions and behaviour, damaging our quality of life and that of those we live with.
Low self-esteem can be the result of damaging parenting, bullying or abusive adult relationships. Consequences can be many and varied: fear and anxiety about not being good enough, sometimes leading to a constant search for reassurance or becoming a perfectionist; fear of failure which limits any new activity or risk taking; needy behaviour in relationships, either seeking or rejecting recognition and praise; behaving in irrational, negative and self-destructive ways.
If you recognise low self-esteem as something which is negatively impacting on your life and would like help to change this, contact me, Anne Roberts, Counselling South West, on t: 01297 301035 m: 07887 961954 email: info@couplecounsellor.co.uk: www.couplecounsellor.co.uk

Relationships: Doc Martins doing it

It can often take some time to decide to take the plunge and organising counselling. It may have been discussed in moments of stress but put on the back burner when tension eases or a difficulty is resolved. Also one partner may want to have counselling and the other doesn’t and only reluctantly agrees. It may also be that the relationship finally breaks down and one partner talks about leaving, so the other is galvanised into doing something about it quickly.

Relationships: New Year resolutions

It can often take some time to decide to take the plunge and organising counselling. It may have been discussed in moments of stress but put on the back burner when tension eases or a difficulty is resolved. Also one partner may want to have counselling and the other doesn’t and only reluctantly agrees. It may also be that the relationship finally breaks down and one partner talks about leaving, so the other is galvanised into doing something about it quickly.

Relationships!

It can often take some time to decide to take the plunge and organising counselling. It may have been discussed in moments of stress but put on the back burner when tension eases or a difficulty is resolved. Also one partner may want to have counselling and the other doesn’t and only reluctantly agrees. It may also be that the relationship finally breaks down and one partner talks about leaving, so the other is galvanised into doing something about it quickly.

Relationships: You’ve lost that loving feeling

Whatever the reason for coming, I offer a calm, comfortable and confidential environment where I will work impartially. I will manage communication so that arguments are reduced in the session so both of you can speak and be listened to, and provide the opportunity to explore your relationship.

Relationships: Grandparents

It can often take some time to decide to take the plunge and organising counselling. It may have been discussed in moments of stress but put on the back burner when tension eases or a difficulty is resolved. Also one partner may want to have counselling and the other doesn’t and only reluctantly agrees. It may also be that the relationship finally breaks down and one partner talks about leaving, so the other is galvanised into doing something about it quickly.

Relationships: word power

It can often take some time to decide to take the plunge and organising counselling. It may have been discussed in moments of stress but put on the back burner when tension eases or a difficulty is resolved. Also one partner may want to have counselling and the other doesn’t and only reluctantly agrees. It may also be that the relationship finally breaks down and one partner talks about leaving, so the other is galvanised into doing something about it quickly.